Sea Blue Lens


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Photo-Heart Connection: October

The Way the Wind Blows

I’ve had a hard time with the Photo-Heart Connection this month, and, in fact, almost let it pass me by. It’s not that I lack for photos to choose from. The problem is with the heart.

Fall has always been my favorite season of the year, even though I grew up in a place where fall was marked not by spectacular color, but merely a cooling and mellowing of the summer’s blistering heat. Leaves simply turned brown and fell off the trees, leaving behind bare branches against blue sky.

Seventeen years ago, I left the desert behind and moved east, where I finally experienced autumn in all its glory and loved it more than ever. Now I’m back, not exactly in the desert but close to it. I’m far away from a lot of people I love. And while I’m happy and grateful to be here in this beautiful place, close to other people I love, my heart is torn.

Fall for me is a nostalgic time of year anyway, and this year it feels especially poignant. I love my new home, and find joy in it every day. I’m also seriously homesick for Maine and the friends and family left behind. I feel tears welling up at unexpected moments. I feel a bit like that weathervane up there, turned in a different direction with each passing breeze.

I’m keeping busy (in a relaxed sort of way) and try to do something every day to settle in here a little deeper. Like a transplanted tree, it will take time to put out new roots and become established in this new soil. It will take a bit of protection from the strongest winds. But in the end, those winds will help to strengthen the trunk and roots and branches of that tree.

I try not to think too much about it all, but just let myself feel what comes. I know it will pass. Whichever way they blow, the winds always die down and calm returns.

So that’s my Photo-Heart Connection for this October. For me, fall is still what it was all along . . . a time both for looking back and for new beginnings. I wonder what November will bring?

Thanks to Kat Sloma for hosting this linkup each month. It’s a great chance to look over the images taken during the month and think more deeply about the one that speaks most to my heart.

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What’s the Problem?

Breaking Through

Here we go, embarking on a new Find Your Eye journey. This one is called Journey of Inspiration, and boy, am I ready to be inspired some more. The first assignment is to think and write about my experience in solving problems in my photography.

This one has me stymied. I’ve been trying to think of a photographic problem I’ve solved. All I can think of are problems I wish I could solve! The first one is time, or rather lack of it. I could get so much more photography done if I didn’t have to go to work every day! Of course, if it weren’t for the work, I’d probably have to hock my camera to buy food, so I guess quitting my job won’t solve my photographic problems.

Since I have a brand new dSLR, I’m facing the “problem” of figuring out what it can do and how to use it. My solution for that, as with most problems, is: Read the instructions. That’s a solution I really do use over and over, and it always works for me.

I’m a great one for following instructions, and I always want to learn all I can about everything. However, when I first took this camera out of its box, I charged the battery and simply started shooting. On Auto, of course. Over a month later, I’m still on Auto. Hence my desire for time . . . time to master the manual — and the manual mode. I’m hoping to get some practice in this weekend.

I finally did think of one photographic problem I learned a solution for a long time ago that I still use today. It has to do with photography at the beginning or end of the day. If I aim my camera at the scenery, the camera will expose for that and the sky will be washed out. So usually I point the camera at the sky and lock in the exposure, then recompose for the composition I want. The scenery will be darker, sometimes even silhouetted, but the sky and clouds will be full of color and detail. Often I like that silhouette effect, but if not, I can usually make some adjustments in post processing to bring out more detail in the shadow areas.

These are a few examples from my recent vacation:

Silver Dawn

Dry Rain

Riding Out the Storm

I feel like I haven’t really answered the question, but it’s been a long week and that’s all I’ve got for now. You’ve got me thinking again, Kat.

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